What makes the Advocate Grant Program unique? | Society for Science & the Public
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What makes the Advocate Grant Program unique?

February 7, 2019
Advocates Charmain Brammer and Noelle Martell with students at the Advocate Training Institute.

Want to diversify STEM? Here’s an opportunity to do so. The Society’s Advocate Grant Program aims to bolster the participation of underrepresented and low-income students in science research competitions by providing mentors with training, stipends of $3,000 and year-round support. Read more about what makes the program unique from last year’s Advocates and apply today

 

Pictured: Pamela Patterson-Anhalt.

Pamela Patterson-Anhalt, Shawano Community High School, Shawano, Wisconsin

“The Advocate program is set up in a manner that enables us (Advocates) to directly impact students. We are in the schools and can encourage and assist students in research and entering science competitions.”

Charmain Brammer, SUCCESS Academy DSU, St George, Utah

“This program is designed with students and teachers in mind. It provides me directly with funds to spend time outside of school helping students gain confidence in their abilities to carry out and present a research project.”

Advocate Mark Friedman conversing with another Advocate.

Mark Friedman, Los Angeles Maritime Institute, San Pedro, California

“This program affords passionate teachers an opportunity to work with a small group of students on special projects and to devote necessary attention to their development of scientific research skills.  It is an opportunity for us to go beyond what we normally do in the classroom, seeing 100 or more students daily, to advance the educational and scientific understanding of a dedicated group that will lead to a rectification of the lack of black and Latino students entering fields of science and medicine.”

Pictured: Elizabeth Proctor

Marteen Nolan, Crocker R-2 High School, Crocker, Missouri

“The training received at the Advocate training weekend is among the very best professional development I have received, plus you network with like educators from across the country, exchanging best practices and developing lasting relationships (and the Society takes excellent care of you while in Washington, DC!).  The networking continues with monthly Advocate phone calls, as well as creating a repository for outstanding resources from all Advocates.”

Elizabeth Proctor, Jasper County High School, Monticello, Georgia

“Students from low socioeconomic backgrounds are often at a disadvantage for reasons that are unacceptable such as: entry fees, lack of transportation, tri-boards, printing pictures and other incidentals. The Advocate grant not only provides funding that can be applied to these limitations, but it also provides a support network of other teachers all working to address the issues that arise when working with an undeserved population."