Research at Home: Citizen Science

Citizen science projects can be a great way to take a dive into research anytime, anywhere.

You can participate in a citizen science project, analyze data from these projects for your own research, get ideas for your own spin-off research, or create your own citizen science project.

Stephen Andrews, a student from New Jersey, contributed time to the Power to the People project on Zooniverse. PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHEN ANDREWS

Contribute to a Citizen Science Project

Zooniverse

With over 100 projects to choose from and no experience necessary, you can start classifying galaxies, finding kelp forests, or locating homes in rural Africa in minutes!

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National Geographic

Did you know snapping mountain-top photos of smog and listening for frog calls can help scientists? Get engaged in these projects recommended by National Geographic!

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Smithsonian

Contribute to the Encyclopedia of Life, transcribe field notes of notable scientists, or contribute to climate research by analyzing ginkgo trees in these Smithsonian-sponsored projects!

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Inventing Tomorrow

Check out these citizen science projects led by our friends at Inventing Tomorrow: Water Insights, Curio, ISeeChange

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Foldit

Foldit is a crowdsourcing computer game enabling you to help fight disease by contributing to protein folding research.

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ISEF Abstracts on Citizen Science

Check out these ISEF projects in Earth and Environmental Sciences and Animal Sciences, two of the twenty-one Regeneron ISEF categories. See more ISEF abstracts by visiting the ISEF Project database.

Society Blog Posts about Citizen Science

Start Your Own Citizen Science Project

Citizen Science Projects that Share Their Data

Articles about Citizen Science

Science News and Science News for Students are our award-winning publications that cover current advances across all STEM disciplines. We have gathered a collection of articles specifically on Citizen Science to further shed light on this topic and provide inspiration for student research projects.

Kids make great citizen scientists

Researchers are making important discoveries, thanks to help from people of all ages

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS ARTICLE

 

These women endured a winter in the high Arctic for citizen science

The two are spending nine months on Svalbard to collect data for climate scientists

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS ARTICLE

Getting on the citizen science train

If you have curiosity and a computer, you can participate in scientific projects

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS ARTICLE

An astrophysicist honors citizen scientists in the age of big data

The Crowd and the Cosmos examines the role of amateurs in science

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Citizen scientists spy on camel crickets

Hiding in dark basements and garages, these insects live across the United States

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS ARTICLE

Photographing wildflowers and other ways you can help fight climate change

Even nonscientists can take part in climate and conservation research

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS ARTICLE

Scooping poop for science

Finnish study enlists members of 4H for a study on cowpats

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS ARTICLE

Scientists seek bat detectives

You could help in an online research study by picking out bat calls

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS FOR STUDENTS ARTICLE

What do plants and animals do during an eclipse?

A citizen science project aims to gather data to put science behind anecdotal evidence. Want Science News for free for your school? Teachers can sign up for Science News in High Schools.

READ THE SCIENCE NEWS ARTICLE