Society Advocate mentors first place science fair winner | Society for Science & the Public
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Outreach & Equity

Society Advocate mentors first place science fair winner

September 13, 2016

Society for Science & the Public's Advocates mentor students and help them through the process of conducting scientific research and entering it into science fairs. 

Pat Monteith, a Society Advocate for the 2016-2017 school year, said one of her students she's worked with for the past two years recently won first place in a science competition, the Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics. The award comes with $2,000 cash and a laptop.

Pat is part of the Society's Advocate Grant Program, which provides a stipend to individuals who serve as an advocate for underrepresented students to help them move from conducting a scientific or engineering research project to completing applications for scientific competitions.

I am so proud of this young lady who has continued to improve her project since I first met her.

"One of the students I've been working with for the past two years, Chelsey Skeete, went to the NAACP ACT-SO (Afro-Academic, Cultural, Technological and Scientific Olympics) competition and won the first place Gold Medal in microbiology!" Pat said.

Society Advocate Pat Monteith with one of her students, Chelsey Skeete, who recently won first place in a science competition.
Society Advocate Pat Monteith with one of her students, Chelsey Skeete, who recently won first place in a science competition. PHOTO COURTESY OF PAT MONTEITH.

"I am so very proud of this young lady who has continued to improve her project since I first met her," Pat said. "The feedback she got from her state science fair and Intel ISEF judges was instrumental in her success at this competition. It just proves that the old adage is correct, 'if at first you don't succeed, try, try again,' which is especially apropos advice for young scientists!"