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Science News for Students

Share what a scientist looks like

August 31, 2016
This is what a scientist looks like! Science writer Bethany Brookshire shows off one of her favorite shirts, covered in drawings of brain cells.
This is what a scientist looks like! Science writer Bethany Brookshire shows off one of her favorite shirts, covered in drawings of brain cells.
SOCIETY FOR SCIENCE & THE PUBLIC/B. BROOKSHIRE.

Science News for Students is seeking images, audio and video of women in science for its upcoming feature about the importance of women in STEM — and the challenges they face.

Science News for Students, an online publication of Society for Science & the Public, wants to show what a scientist looks like. For many years, the answer looked like a Caucasian male, often with a funny hairdo and a lab coat. But women are scientists too, and science, technology, engineering, and math (or STEM) fields are better for it.

Are you a female-identifying person in science, technology, engineering, or math? We want to see you and hear your voice. Science News for Students is collecting images, audio recordings and short video clips of women in STEM. Send us an image of you in the lab, doing what you do best. Or you can send a picture of you at home, at school, in the field or engaging in your favorite hobby. You can also send in short audio clips about your life in science.

Each image or audio clip should contain the following information:

  • Your name
  • Where you work
  • What kind of scientist you are and what you study
  • An interesting fact about yourself (and it doesn't have to be STEM-related)

Please send your images, sound clips and video to sciencenewsforstudents@gmail.com by September 9, 2016. Science News for Students will highlight the images, videos, and sound bites in the feature story and on the Eureka! Lab blog.

Help us show students everywhere examples of fantastic, brilliant women in STEM.