Science News in High Schools helps students find their scientific passion | Society for Science & the Public
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Science News in High Schools helps students find their scientific passion

May 16, 2018
Anna Rhymes, Science News in High Schools Program Manager, led a symposia about the program at this year's Intel ISEF.
Photo Courtesy of Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public.

Students in Lisa Fridman's research class at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute look forward to the cookie research lab that takes place every year. But as Lisa told attendees at the "Teaching Current Research and Science Literacy with Science News in High Schools" symposia at the International Science and Engineering Fair (Intel ISEF), students often have down time during this project as they are waiting for the cookies to bake. 

To help keep students busy and engaged during down time, Lisa has them read Science News. As a participant in the Science News in High Schools Program, she receives ten copies of each issue, which come out every two weeks.

Attendees of the "Teaching Current Research and Science Literacy with Science News in High Schools" symposia had the opportunity to read one of the Educator Guides that are included with each issue. Photo Courtesy of Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public. 

Reaching over 10,000 teachers and 4.1 million students across the U.S. and worldwide, Society for Science & the Public's Science News in High Schools program brings Science News magazines and accompanying Educator Guides to high schools, giving students access to the latest in-depth reporting on science topics. 


Learn more about Science News in High Schools. 


At the symposia, led by Anna Rhymes, Science News in High Schools Program Manager, teachers learned more about this valuable program and heard from Lisa, who shared her experience as a participant in the program. 

I use Science News to help students figure out what they are interested in.

In addition to keeping students engaged during down time, Lisa uses Science News to keep her students up to date on science research across disciplines and find research topics that intrigue them and can be submitted to science competitions.

"My students don’t know what they are interested in," Lisa said. "I use Science News to help students figure out what they are interested in and want to research." 

Lisa Fridman, a teacher at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, explains how she uses the Science News in High Schools program to teach current research and science literacy. Photo Courtesy of Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public. 

Lisa's students have been inspired to conduct research based on Science News articles they have read. Evains Francois, a junior at Baltimore Polytechnic Academy, was inspired to study roaches and designs robots based on their movements after reading a Science News article

Thanks to Science News in High Schools, countless students are being inspired to pursue science research projects and keep up to date on the latest research. Help your students be one of them by learning more about this program that is transforming how students and educators interact with science in the classroom.