Regeneron is new Sponsor of the Science Talent Search | Society for Science & the Public
Previous Story:
Regeneron Founded by Two STS Alumni
Next Story:
Alumni to watch: Michael Li & The Data Incubator

Regeneron is new Sponsor of the Science Talent Search

May 26, 2016

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is the new title sponsor of the Science Talent Search. Selected through a competitive process that garnered interest from the nation’s leading companies and philanthropists, Regeneron will become only the third sponsor in 75 years of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious high school science competition.

Regeneron is committing $100 million to support the Science Talent Search (STS) and other Society programs through 2026 and will assume title sponsorship of the competition effective immediately.

As part of its commitment, Regeneron is nearly doubling the overall award distribution to $3.1 million annually, increasing the top award to $250,000, and doubling the awards for the top 300 young scientists and their schools to $2,000 each. During its history, STS has provided more than $25 million in awards to over 8,500 students and schools.

Regeneron's CEO and CSO are both STS alumni, so the program is very close to them.

“Regeneron is led by two alumni of the Science Talent Search, so we know first-hand what it means to promising young students,” said Leonard Schleifer, M.D., Ph.D., Founder, President and Chief Executive Officer of Regeneron and an alumnus of the 1970 Science Talent Search. “It’s absolutely critical that the best and brightest minds pursue careers in science and engineering. This unrivaled program provides important motivation and reinforcement for talented young people to stay this course.”

The new sponsorship was celebrated at a special event Thursday morning at the American Museum of Natural History, which is known for its extensive science education program. The event was hosted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ph.D., the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.

“We are honored to be the new sponsors of the Science Talent Search, a national treasure that showcases the critical role science plays in advancing society. For me, participating in the Science Talent Search was a life-changing experience that inspired my future scientific career,” said George D. Yancopoulos, M.D., Ph.D., Founding Scientist and Chief Scientific Officer of Regeneron, President of Regeneron Laboratories and a top winner of the 1976 Science Talent Search. “For nearly 30 years, Regeneron has worked to turn groundbreaking science into medicines that will improve human lives. We are committed to supporting a rich pipeline of future talent who will improve our world through science and engineering for generations to come.”

“The commitment that Regeneron has made to the Society for Science & the Public and our storied program is extraordinary,” said Maya Ajmera, President and CEO of the Society, Publisher of Science News and an alumna of the 1985 Science Talent Search. “In the 75-year history of this competition and nearly a century of science education, this is the largest commitment we’ve ever received from a single organization. Through the dedication of Regeneron not only to continue but to advance the Science Talent Search, we will be expanding the program’s reach like never before, extending the opportunities that individual research can offer and inspiring even more of our nation’s talented young scientists.”

As a key component of the sponsorship, $30 million will be dedicated to scaling Society initiatives focused on increasing outreach and equity for students across the United States to nurture their interest in the sciences. This funding will support inspirational and aspirational programming designed to reach new and underprivileged communities, support teachers and inspire more students to pursue careers in STEM.

Intel was the title sponsor of STS from 1998-2016. For the first 55 years (1942-1997) of the Science Talent Search, Westinghouse was the title sponsor.