See Nation’s Most Innovative Teen Scientists in Action at the Intel Science Talent Search | Society for Science & the Public

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See Nation’s Most Innovative Teen Scientists in Action at the Intel Science Talent Search

March 8, 2016

 

This week, 40 brilliant high school seniors will convene in Washington, D.C., for the Intel Science Talent Search 2016, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the nation’s oldest and most prestigious pre-college science and math competition. This elite group of young scientists includes students from 38 schools in 18 states.

From March 10-16, the Intel Science Talent Search finalists will compete for more than $1 million in awards provided by the Intel Foundation, including three first-place Medal of Distinction awards of $150,000 each that will be presented to students who show exceptional scientific potential in three areas: basic research, global good and innovation.

Media are invited to attend a public exhibition of the Intel Science Talent Search finalists’ projects and meet the next generation of scientists, researchers and engineers. Finalists will be available for interviews and photos as they display, describe and answer questions about their research.

Public Exhibition of Projects:
Sunday, March 13, 1-4 p.m. ET
National Geographic Society
1145 17th St NW
Washington, DC 20036
     

All 40 Intel Science Talent Search 2016 finalists. The high schools seniors’ research projects include:

  • An identification platform that utilizes the unique arm and hand motions individuals use to pick up their smartphones to improve mobile security.
  • A low-cost, smartphone-based tool to diagnose respiratory illnesses such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
  • An ambitious endeavor to find undiscovered exoplanetary systems by analyzing data from stars in a region of space known as the galactic center.  
  • A way to modify plastics that are commonly used in littered items, such as grocery bags and milk jugs, so they degrade 90 percent faster when exposed to ultraviolet light.
  • A new process to grow kidney cells from human stem cells, which could eventually eliminate the need for donor kidneys for transplantation.

For a full list of finalists, visit: https://student.societyforscience.org/intel-sts.

To RSVP for the event or to schedule interviews, contact Olivia Campbell, 646-384-2095, olivia.campbell@nof9.com.